Affordable Housing News

Register now for free Q&As at The Housing Conference

Posted by NMA on Apr 11, 2017 12:39:24 PM

The Housing Conference in Boston

Signups for Q&A sessions at The Housing Conference are now open!

We’re thrilled to be taking our fifth annual national housing conference to Boston this August. Included with every conference registration is the opportunity to reserve a free, one-hour Q&A session with one of our NMA experts, including Nan herself!

If you’re registered for the conference and want to sign up for a session, click here and reserve your time now. The Q&A sessions are limited to registered attendees and will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis.

The tentative agenda has just been updated, and when you register now you'll receive early bird pricing!

Join us August 21-22, 2017, for two fantastic days of networking, learning, and exploring the beautiful and historic city of Boston, Massachusetts. Industry experts will present sessions and panels on the latest topics in affordable housing, including:

  • An update on UPCS-V, the proposed inspections protocol to replace HQS
  • How to deal with generational differences in the workplace
  • What you need to know if you're a new executive director
  • Nan McKay's annual legislative update, including new rules and notices
  • Best practices in PBV and RAD PBV
  • Public/private partnerships and grant funds
  • What you need to know before applying for MTW
  • Understanding tax credits and RAD finance
  • Best practices in managing FSS, plus how to start a new FSS program in PBRA
  • What's new in capital fund finance
  • Best practices in PBRA and RAD PBRA
  • Effective waitlist management
  • What's new in fair housing
  • Best practices in SEMAP
  • CDBG-DR and resilience
  • Roundtable panel session with NMA Housing Awards winners
  • And more!

Visit our website to register!

Topics: capital fund, CDBG, fair housing, financial management, FSS, HQS, inspections, LIHTC, MTW, NMA Housing Awards, PBRA, PBV, Program News and Notices, RAD, SEMAP, The Housing Conference, UPCS-V

Agenda now available for 2017 national conference

Posted by NMA on Mar 13, 2017 11:39:22 AM

The Housing Conference | August 21-22, 2017 | Boston, MAThe tentative agenda for our fifth annual national housing conference is now available, and when you register now you'll receive early bird pricing!

Join us August 21-22, 2017, for two fantastic days of networking, learning,
and exploring the beautiful and historic city of Boston, Massachusetts. Industry experts will present sessions and panels on the latest topics in affordable housing, including:

  • An update on UPCS-V, the proposed inspections protocol to replace HQS (panel session)
  • Best practices in managing FSS, plus how to start a new FSS program in PBRA (panel session)
  • Best practices in PBRA and RAD PBRA (panel session)
  • Best practices in PBV and RAD PBV
  • Best practices in SEMAP (hands-on session)
  • CDBG-DR and resilience
  • Effective waitlist management
  • How to deal with generational differences in the workplace
  • Nan McKay's annual legislative update, including new rules and notices
  • Public/private partnerships and grant funds (panel session)
  • Quality control
  • Rent reasonableness
  • Roundtable panel session with NMA Housing Awards winners
  • Succession planning
  • Understanding tax credits and RAD finance
  • What you need to know before applying for MTW
  • What you need to know if you're a new executive director
  • What's new in capital fund finance
  • What's new in fair housing

Visit our website to register!

Topics: capital fund, CDBG, fair housing, FSS, HQS, inspections, LIHTC, MTW, NMA Housing Awards, PBRA, PBV, Program News and Notices, quality control, RAD, rent reasonableness, SEMAP, The Housing Conference, UPCS-V

The Best Defense Is a Good Offense: Strategies for Success in HCV Audits

Posted by NMA on Aug 30, 2016 10:29:34 AM

John Achuff will be leading a session on strategies for HCV audits at The Housing Conference this September in San Antonio

John Achuff has been an NMA trainer for nearly a decade and currently serves as assistant director at a very large housing authority in the Midwest, where he manages 17,000 housing choice vouchers, 2,700 project based vouchers, 1,200 moderate rehabilitation units, and the housing authority's waiting lists. He possesses a broad base of program knowledge, having taught nearly every NMA seminar, with a focus on regulatory knowledge, program management, quality control, SEMAP, and single file audit. He will be presenting the following session at The Housing Conference next month.

Best Practices for Program Success

The Best Defense Is a Good Offense: Strategies for Success in HCV Audits
Presenter, John Achuff

Back for the second year by popular demand! In this interactive session, we'll cover best practices for administering the HCV program in a manner that minimizes the number of audit findings and increases the chance of becoming a high performer under SEMAP. The strategies are broken into two categories: 1) how to prevent errors and increase accuracy the first time transactions are processed (offensive moves); 2) how to effectively develop a quality control program to detect errors on the back end (defensive moves).

In offensive moves, we'll focus on suggested criteria for hiring the best candidates, developing the right training program, using tools and technology to increase accuracy, and employing coaching techniques to improve performance of staff. In defensive moves, we'll discuss suggestions for developing an effective quality control program, using reports to detect errors and discrepancies in a more efficient way, establishing additional safeguards for the finance team, and preparing for audits. This session will give HCV directors, supervisors, and staff useful guidelines and expert tips to establish the right combination of offense and defense to foster success in the HCV program.

John and other industry experts will be available for limited free one-hour Q&A sessions at The Housing Conference to registered participants. Don’t delay, signups close this Friday! Register online or email sales@nanmckay.com for more information.

Topics: quality control, SEMAP, The Housing Conference, Trainers and Consultants

The Best Defense Is a Good Offense: Strategies for Success in HCV Audits

Posted by BEMuser on Sep 16, 2015 9:12:34 AM

NMA senior consultant John Achuff will be leading a session on HCV audit strategy at this year's NMA Housing Conference NMA trainer John Achuff will be leading a session on HCV audit strategy at this year's NMA Housing Conference

John Achuff has been an NMA trainer for seven years and currently serves as manager of operations at a very large housing authority in the Midwest, overseeing 40 staff members and 14,000 housing vouchers. He possesses a broad base of program knowledge, having taught nearly every NMA seminar, with a focus on regulatory knowledge, program management, quality control, SEMAP, and single file audit. He will be presenting the following session at the 2015 NMA and GoSection8 Housing Conference.

Hands-on Learning for Active Solutions

The Best Defense Is a Good Offense: Strategies for Success in HCV Audits
Presenter, John Achuff

In this interactive session, we'll cover best practices for administering the HCV program in a manner that minimizes the number of audit findings and increases the chance of becoming a high performer under SEMAP. The strategies are broken into two categories: 1) how to prevent errors and increase accuracy the first time transactions are processed (offensive moves); 2) how to effectively develop a quality control program to detect errors on the back end (defensive moves).

In offensive moves, we'll focus on suggested criteria for hiring the best candidates, developing the right training program, using tools and technology to increase accuracy, and employing coaching techniques to improve performance of staff. In defensive moves, we'll discuss suggestions for developing an effective quality control program, using reports to detect errors and discrepancies in a more efficient way, establishing additional safeguards for the finance team, and preparing for audits. This session will give HCV directors, supervisors, and staff useful guidelines and expert tips to establish the right combination of offense and defense to foster success in the HCV program.

John and other industry experts will be available for limited free one-hour consulting sessions at the 2015 NMA and GoSection8 Housing Conference. Registered participants can sign up on a first-come, first-served basis now. Register online or email sales@nanmckay.com for more information.

Topics: GoSection8, quality control, SEMAP, The Housing Conference, Trainers and Consultants

SEMAP: Beyond the Regulations

Posted by BEMuser on Aug 20, 2015 8:54:11 AM

NMA senior consultant Teri Robertson will be presenting a session on SEMAP at the 2015 NMA Housing Conference NMA senior consultant Teri Robertson will be presenting a session on SEMAP at the 2015 NMA Housing Conference

NMA senior consultant Teri Robertson is nationally recognized as a leading expert in HCV/Section 8 and public housing. She has written for the NMA blog about HCV administrative fees, how to maximize your agency’s performance rating, and working with sequestration in the HCV program. Teri will be presenting the following session at the 2015 NMA and GoSection8 Housing Conference.

Regulatory Knowledge for Smart Management

SEMAP: Beyond the Regulations
Presenter, Teri Robertson

In this session, we will cover SEMAP, clarifying the 24 CFR 985 regulations. Each indicator is fully explained, along with industry best practices on how to successfully manage indicators throughout your fiscal year. NMA has conducted many internal audits for PHAs, finding many common mistakes and misunderstandings that surround SEMAP. These pitfalls are shared to allow PHAs to avoid the same errors.

Teri and other industry experts will be available for limited free one-hour consulting sessions at the 2015 NMA and GoSection8 Housing Conference. Registered participants can sign up on a first-come, first-served basis now. Register online or email sales@nanmckay.com for more information.

Topics: GoSection8, SEMAP, The Housing Conference, Trainers and Consultants

Get certified for housing quality standards (HQS) online!

Posted by BEMuser on Jan 28, 2015 3:33:46 PM

Jay OrtenzoDid you know that you can receive an official HQS certification without even leaving your desk? Nan McKay and Associates is now offering our Housing Quality Standards (HQS) certification online:

Upon completion of this Nan McKay certification course, learners will have the information and skills required to complete HQS inspections on vacant or occupied units to determine if units pass or fail pursuant to HQS minimum standards. The course covers the correct completion of an HQS inspection form during the inspection, how to design an upgrade to HQS when given the assignment to develop a higher reasonable standard with HUD approval, as well as lead-based paint regulations and their impact on the HCV program. In addition, HQS-related SEMAP indicators and their impact on the PHA's SEMAP score are included.

The 16-hour class is led by NMA senior trainer Jay Ortenzo, a seasoned expert in HQS inspections who will guide you through the standards in a practical and easy-to-understand format. You may also be interested in the Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards certification, a 4.5-hour class in which Jay covers accessibility standards, fair housing, auditing, and compliance. Learners are taught about voluntary compliance agreement (VCA) trends, sample lawsuits, and how the Department of Justice (DOJ) is driving compliance.

Our longtime partnership with HTVN offers students the opportunity to enjoy many training options, all of which provide a Nan McKay and Associates certification upon successful completion. NMA and HTVN are the only IACET-approved training and certification companies serving the affordable housing and public housing industries, which means you get the highest quality training plus the certification to show your achievement. IACET is a nonprofit association dedicated to quality continuing education and training programs, and is the only standard-setting organization approved by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for continuing education and training.

Other available online NMA certifications include:

For more details, email sales@nanmckay.com. And don't miss this recent blog post with tips to help you get the most out of your online training.

Specializing in real property services, Jay Ortenzo has been a technical trainer and consultant with Nan McKay and Associates for more than 20 years. With nearly four decades of housing experience in both public and private sectors, he develops technical training manuals and materials relating to federally subsidized programs on housing inspection, maintenance, and modernization.

Topics: fair housing, HQS, HTVN, IACET, inspections, online learning, Partnerships, public housing management, reasonable accommodation, rent calculation, SEMAP, Trainers and Consultants

How does the capital fund final rule affect PHAs? Part II

Posted by BEMuser on Aug 27, 2014 10:05:07 AM

Late last year, HUD published the much-anticipated capital fund final rule in the Federal Register. Effective November 25, 2013, the new regulation combined and streamlined former capital fund program (CFP) requirements for rehabilitation and development into one comprehensive regulation.

It goes without saying that while much has remained the same, some significant changes have occurred, and understanding these changes is crucial for efficient and uniform program implementation and management. We hope that this blog series will provide you not only with an overview of the final rule, but also the answers to some questions you many have, and that it will ultimately help you navigate these changes.

Who does the rule apply to?

The capital fund final rule provides financial assistance to PHAs and resident management corporations (RMCs) to make improvements to develop public housing. It applies to all PHAs that have public housing units under the annual contributions contract (ACC).

What are some of the major changes brought about by the rule?

The main purpose of the rule is to provide a better understanding of program requirements for PHAs and residents to more effectively use capital funds, but there are several other changes brought about by the final rule as well. These include:

  • Decoupling (separating) capital fund submission requirements from the larger PHA plan requirements
  • Directing more funds towards modernization and maintaining the PHA's physical inventory, given our limited fiscal environment
  • Simplifying mixed-finance requirements
  • Incorporating HUD's energy efficiency strategic goals, and allowing total development cost (TDC) exception for cost-saving energy initiatives

Given these changes, what is the new process for submitting capital fund requirements?

Because the capital fund final rule decouples capital fund forms from the larger PHA plan submission, PHAs now submit their capital fund requirements with the ACC amendment. The final rule eliminates requirements to submit a preliminary budget, so there's only one budget submission. Additionally, the final rule enables PHAs to hold only one public hearing. All PHAs must complete a physical needs assessment (PNA).

These submission requirements apply to both qualified and non-qualified PHAs. The definition of qualified PHAs found at 24 CFR 903.3 is now the one used for the purposes of the CFP as per the capital fund final rule. Qualified PHAs are PHAs that administer 550 or fewer units (the sum of public housing units and vouchers under Section 8(o)) that are not designated as a troubled PHA under SEMAP during the prior 12 months. PHAs that meet this definition are not required to file the PHA annual plan.

Next week, we'll discuss what the CFP funds can be used for.

Kaylene Holvenstot has been a technical writer at NMA since 2008. She contributes to and edits NMA Master Books, seminars, and model policies while researching and analyzing the latest HUD guidance to ensure that all course material is always up to date and fully accurate.

NMA’s Capital Fund Program seminar provides you with the information you need to understand and accurately apply the capital fund final rule. Don't miss the upcoming session in Cincinnati this October — save 10% when you register before August 30!

Topics: capital fund, final rule, PNA, SEMAP, Trainers and Consultants

Boot Camp: Hot Topics in Rent Calculation

Posted by BEMuser on Jul 10, 2014 9:57:06 AM

Terry Provance with president and founder Nan McKay, cohosting a session at last year’s NMA Housing Conference NMA senior trainer Terry Provance with president and founder Nan McKay, cohosting a session at last year’s NMA Housing Conference

Terry Provance has been a trainer and consultant at Nan McKay and Associates since 1999. He recently took the lead role in creating and developing NMA’s PH Occupancy Tracking Tool, which can be used by any rental development, whether or not it’s HUD-assisted, including mixed finance and LIHTC properties. Terry will be presenting the following session at the 2014 NMA and GoSection8 Housing Conference.

Hands-on Learning for Active Solutions

Boot Camp: Hot Topics in Rent Calculation
Presenter, Terry Provance

Are you challenged by intricate rent calculation rules? Do you worry about what an audit of the participant files will find? If your answer is yes, this session is for you.

In this presentation, we'll explore the more challenging issues in HCV and public housing rent calculation, including the earned income disallowance, multiple assets, and multiple allowances and deductions. With SEMAP scores and the financial health of your projects at stake, it's absolutely essential to understand the concepts behind complicated calculations.

Terry and other industry experts will be available for limited free one-hour consulting sessions at the 2014 NMA and GoSection8 Housing Conference. Registered participants can sign up on a first-come, first-served basis starting next week. Register online or email sales@nanmckay.com for more information.

Topics: GoSection8, rent calculation, SEMAP, The Housing Conference, Trainers and Consultants

What does the deregulation of HQS inspections mean for our industry?

Posted by BEMuser on Jun 30, 2014 10:16:22 AM

Until last week, when HUD published the implementation notice for the changes mandated by the 2014 appropriations act, housing authorities were required to inspect units at the time of initial lease-up and thereafter at least once every twelve months. The new notice relaxes that requirement, specifying that an HQS inspection must occur at least once every two years.

It also provides PHAs with the option of relying on comparable inspections done by other agencies, such as those performed for the HOME or low-income housing tax credit (LIHTC) programs, if the other inspection uses similar standards to HUD's housing quality standards (HQS). This will be true for both initial and ongoing inspections.

PHAs are still responsible for ensuring that subsidies are paid only for units meeting HQS. The hope is that PHAs will focus inspections on the most risky units, while improving compliance overall.

In addition to this widely discussed change from annual inspections to biennial inspections, there's also the issue of self-certification, with relatively undefined guidelines. HUD offered some guidance last year with the issuance of Notice PIH 2013-17, which provided instructions for the use of photos during the HQS inspection process and included the key point that PHAs may use them to verify that deficiencies have been corrected.

These HQS deregulations are intended to save costs, reduce administrative burdens, and streamline rental programs. While they are now available for implementation by PHAs on a limited basis, further guidance and rule making is expected from HUD. However, we now have enough information to discuss and plan for these changes. How will they affect the affordable housing industry and, more importantly, how will they affect the families we serve?

Over the last year, the housing choice voucher program felt some of the most immediate and severe consequences of sequestration. Industry groups estimate that, due to sequestration, the program served about 70,000 fewer families as compared to a year earlier. Reductions in administrative fees have caused financial stress throughout the industry. Ultimately, the entire program has taken a beating over the last few years, and PHAs are struggling to find ways to continue operations and the business of serving families.

Providing access to affordable housing in safe, secure, and sanitary condition remains the mission of our agencies and the foundation of the HCV program. PHAs need to balance available resources to ensure that families have HAP contracts, that lease-ups are done correctly and on time, and that all other requirements are in place. As an industry, we find ourselves considering several weighty questions: How do we balance deregulation of HQS inspections with what's right for the family? How do our decisions reflect the mission statement at each individual agency? At what point do we lose sight of our mission statement?

In other words, just because we can, does that mean we should?

It's a delicate balance. We're faced with a moral dilemma which is driven by economics, need, and desire to help as many families as possible. And we recognize that it's not a perfect environment in today's world and certain things have to give.

Tip #1: Consider your PHA's mission statement.

Most agencies have always viewed themselves as the protector of their clientele, meaning that they are the guiding force that ensures all families have safe, secure, and sanitary housing. That's the mission statement of HQS inspections; it's been the mission statement from the beginning. In moving forward with these new pieces of deregulation, it's important that PHAs consider their own mission statements as they're designing and crafting ways to take advantage of these available resources. Just because these new options are available, are they always the best choice for our agencies and for the families in our program?

The agencies I've been working with recently are grappling with this question, and the answer isn't always immediately clear. Agencies are trying to put their resources in the very best places, and while no one is particularly excited about not doing reinspections or not confirming that repairs have been done, the budgets just don't allow us to do everything we'd like to do. These are very difficult decisions for agencies to make.

The real question is: Where do we put the family in the

mission statement, and how does that apply to deregulation?

Is it always a good idea, and if it is, is it always an all-or-nothing?

Ultimately, we should strive to find a balance between the new options available to us and how we can apply them to the program while staying true to our mission statement.

Tip #2: Don't assume, "Biennial is good, because it's going to save us money."

Biennial inspections are something we've seen handled in two different ways. In some cases, the PHA just cuts inspections down the middle — every odd number gets inspected this year, and the next year the other batch gets inspected. That's a more extreme option.

On the other hand, I work with several MTW agencies that, given this flexibility, chose to focus their efforts on properties that have not been maintained in HQS (that is, they have failed the first inspection) and developed their guidelines accordingly. For example, one agency said, "If you fail the first inspection, we're going to come back out in six months." They want to stay right on top of it. If you pass the first inspection, then you're eligible for the biennial. This reduces the potential for fraud and abuse by landlords.

In the high level, we have two points of deregulation that

are available: self-certification components (without a clear

idea of what that should look like) and biennial inspections,

which have been available to Moving to Work (MTW)

agencies for years and will now be available to all PHAs.

My concern, in the bigger picture, is when you start merging biennial inspections and self-certification. If an agency decides to do biennial inspections but keep reinspections, at least there's a check and balance. Or if an agency says they'll do annual inspections but allow landlords to self-certify, again, there's a check and balance. It's when you start combining both those options that you begin to see how things can unravel.

In the worst-case scenario, you could have a property that fails for significant deficiencies. The landlord opts to participate in the self-certification program. He signs an affidavit that repairs have been made, no reinspection has been put into place, and you end up with a property that hasn't been looked at in two years and isn't safe, secure, or sanitary.

When we push deregulation options to the furthest extreme, it's vital that we consider the risk of paying HAP on a property that doesn't meet minimum HQS and is putting families in danger of living in such conditions for a period of two years before someone even goes out to check.

Tip #3: Think through what your agency would need to manage a well-run self-certification program.

With self-certification, the idea is that we're eliminating the reinspect process, which would save time, effort, and energy for agency staff. But before making a decision, consider what the self-certification option might look like at your agency. Remember, you still have to have an affidavit or an inspection within the 30 days. Even self-certification doesn't allow you to send out a notice and then not have a follow-up. So if you wait 21 days to find out if the certification comes in, and it doesn't, then you're out of time to give reasonable notice to the landlord and the tenant that the inspection is going to move forward.

The primary issue with self-certification, then, is the need it creates for a new tracking system. The most viable one I've seen is that you actually schedule the reinspection, provide the self-certification documentation with a drop-dead date (say, 21 days), and if they haven't provided the self-certification documents within that time period, then the reinspection automatically moves forward. Otherwise you run into a situation where you don't have adequate time to notice it and you're going to be falling outside of the 30-day reinspection notice required by HUD.

So does self-certification actually save time? You've got clerical staff touching these documents two, three, four times — picking up the file, scheduling the reinspection, managing and tracking the self-certification, possibly including images to document proof of repair and appending them to the file, and going in and canceling the reinspection. And they're doing all this manually, because no housing software has a solid tracking system for self-certification — it's something that's just hit the boards, and everyone's doing it a little differently. There's room for a lot of things to slip through the cracks and have a direct impact on SEMAP findings.

Another issue with self-certification is the question of who's going to sign the affidavit — owner, tenant? We're asking someone who's never been to HQS training to certify that a repair meets HQS standards. So the other approach I've seen is agencies asking for proof of repair, such as a photograph or a receipt. But now somebody has to gather the documentation, we still have the notice issue, we still have the reinspection issue, and now you have to have staff focus on tracking every single fail to determine whether or not a self-certification came in, and if it did come in, did the documentation meet minimum standards for your agency to mark it as a pass?

That's a lot of subjective review. It's time-consuming, and it puts an agency at substantial liability because now your agency is making a decision as to whether or not a landlord has provided adequate verification of repair.

Of course, we'll know more about the potential benefits and drawbacks of HQS deregulation after HUD integrates stakeholder input into a final rule. But for the time being, these questions should give us plenty to think about.

As project manager of NMA Inspections, Michael Petragallo leverages over 20 years of experience providing HQS inspection services and more than 1.5 million successfully completed HQS, UPCS, and rehabilitation inspections. Our team of NMAI inspectors have an average background of 12 years’ experience conducting inspections, are highly qualified and certified in HQS and/or UPCS, and have completed required sensitivity and sexual harassment training as well as extensive criminal background checks before beginning work. For more information about NMA Inspections, please visit our website or contact us directly at sales@nanmckay.com.

Topics: appropriations, HQS, inspections, LIHTC, MTW, outsourcing, Partnerships, PIH notices, SEMAP, UPCS

New NMA conference sessions and one-on-one consulting

Posted by NMA on Aug 29, 2013 3:32:22 PM

One week left to register for the 2013 NMA Housing Conference and GoSection8 User Conference! New track sessions and signups for one-on-one consulting have just been announced. To read the full list of sessions, go here.

Executive Leadership for Performance Excellence

Don't Waste Strategy Time on Goal Setting!
Presenter, Eric Kaufmann, President, Sagatica LLC

Most strategy sessions are merely operational — a missed leadership opportunity. Eric Kaufmann guides leadership teams across the country and coaches corporate CEOs. He will present the way to prepare a strategic action plan that becomes a useful resource to accomplish your agency’s goals within limited funding. You will discover the six deadly mistakes of strategy planning. Ask the right questions, set the right measurements, and get to work!

Regulatory Knowledge for Smart Management

Why Your Agency Should Be Taking a Second Look at RAD
Presenter, Carrol Vaughan

The RAD demonstration program is a unique opportunity for housing authorities to convert their at-risk public housing to long-term Section 8 rental assistance contracts. In this session, we’ll cover the latest information on the program and discuss why your housing authority should take a serious look at whether RAD would work for your agency. We’ll also hear from staff at a large housing authority on why their agency is considering submitting an application, and review the thought process involved in making the decision to apply.

Fair Housing/Civil Rights Reviews: Are You Prepared?
Presenter, Annie Stevenson

Using HUD’s civil rights review checklist, we’ll discuss fair housing requirements for the public housing and HCV programs. Topics will include limited English proficiency (LEP), reasonable accommodations, alternative communication methods, and more. Don’t miss this opportunity to prepare for civil rights monitoring.

Free One-on-One NMA Consulting

Reserve your free session with an NMA industry expert! These consulting sessions are limited and will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis. In fact, some are already full, so we encourage you to sign up now.

Nan McKayNan McKay, President and Founder
Expertise: HCV program management






John McKayJohn McKay, CEO
Expertise: Performance management, applying Baldrige principles to affordable housing






Carrol VaughanCarrol Vaughan, VP of Professional Services
Expertise: Procurement, organizational development






Dorian JenkinsDorian Jenkins, VP of Program Management
Expertise: HCV program, public housing leasing, tenant relations, rent collection, REAC prep, cost controls





Cydney JonesCydney Jones, Director of Program Management
Expertise: General HCV topics and issues






Sheryl PutnamSheryl Putnam, Professional Development Manager
Expertise: LIHTC compliance, HOME, PBRA






Samantha PratterSamantha Pratter, Writing Supervisor
Expertise: HCV and public housing eligibility, occupancy, and rent calculation






Annie StevensonAnnie Stevenson, Senior Trainer
Expertise: Fair housing, hearings, EIV, general HCV and public housing topics






Terry ProvanceTerry Provance, Senior Trainer
Expertise: Fair housing, PHAS, public housing property management, general asset management issues





Sammie SzaboSammie Szabo, Associate Trainer
Expertise: General HCV and public housing, PBV, blended occupancy






Jay OrtenzoJay Ortenzo, Property Services Manager
Expertise: HCV inspections and standards, public housing maintenance management






Teri RobertsonTeri Robertson, Senior Consultant
Expertise: SEMAP, quality control, HCV program utilization






Betty TurnerBetty Turner, Senior Associate Trainer
Expertise: Transition to asset management, supervision, working with commissioners






Please note that you must be a registered conference attendee or new registrant in order to take advantage of free consulting sessions. Non-registrants without an accompanying registration are not eligible. Register online or email sales@nanmckay.com for more information. Winners of the 2013 NMA Housing Awards will be announced at the conference — don't miss it!

Topics: asset management, blended occupancy, commissioners, EIV, eligibility, executive management, fair housing, GoSection8, HCV utilization, hearing officer, HQS, inspections, LIHTC, maintenance, NMA Housing Awards, occupancy, PBRA, PBV, PHAS, program management, Program News and Notices, quality control, RAD, rent calculation, SEMAP, supervision, The Housing Conference

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